fuckyeahvintageillustration:

'Beauty and the beast picture book' with the original coloured designs by Walter Crane. Published 1911 by Dodd, Mead and Company, New York. 
See the complete book here.
fuckyeahvintageillustration:

'Beauty and the beast picture book' with the original coloured designs by Walter Crane. Published 1911 by Dodd, Mead and Company, New York. 
See the complete book here.
fuckyeahvintageillustration:

'Beauty and the beast picture book' with the original coloured designs by Walter Crane. Published 1911 by Dodd, Mead and Company, New York. 
See the complete book here.
fuckyeahvintageillustration:

'Beauty and the beast picture book' with the original coloured designs by Walter Crane. Published 1911 by Dodd, Mead and Company, New York. 
See the complete book here.
fuckyeahvintageillustration:

'Beauty and the beast picture book' with the original coloured designs by Walter Crane. Published 1911 by Dodd, Mead and Company, New York. 
See the complete book here.
fuckyeahvintageillustration:

'Beauty and the beast picture book' with the original coloured designs by Walter Crane. Published 1911 by Dodd, Mead and Company, New York. 
See the complete book here.
fuckyeahvintageillustration:

'Beauty and the beast picture book' with the original coloured designs by Walter Crane. Published 1911 by Dodd, Mead and Company, New York. 
See the complete book here.

fuckyeahvintageillustration:

'Beauty and the beast picture book' with the original coloured designs by Walter Crane. Published 1911 by Dodd, Mead and Company, New York. 

See the complete book here.

artisticstuffetc:

Something Artistic Blog asylum-art:
Mozart Guerra Born in Recife, Brazil, in 1962,… via Tumblr

artisticstuffetc:

Something Artistic Blog asylum-art:

Mozart Guerra
Born in Recife, Brazil, in 1962,… via Tumblr

asylum-art:

Barbara Tosatto: Theatrical Paintings Hint at Mythological
Barbara Tosatto ThemesSwiss painter Barbara Tosatto’s work takes cues from the storied and symbolic. Most of her pieces focus on a solitary figure, transplanted in some vacant background, isolated from indicators of time or setting. These figures are human, but disrupted — bound in sheets and gauzy veils, or weighed down with ropes or chains. With titles like “The Tyranny of Doubt” or “The Truce” it’s hard not to see the pieces as portraits of mythological characters, embodying some archetypal human ability or curse. Mostly depicted with their faces obscured, or contorted from some type of bondage, the figures’ entrapment seems more tragic in their desolate surroundings, offering no alternative to the struggle. But their situation is still somehow noble, if seen as shouldering the weight of humanity’s conditions.
via hi fructose
asylum-art:

Barbara Tosatto: Theatrical Paintings Hint at Mythological
Barbara Tosatto ThemesSwiss painter Barbara Tosatto’s work takes cues from the storied and symbolic. Most of her pieces focus on a solitary figure, transplanted in some vacant background, isolated from indicators of time or setting. These figures are human, but disrupted — bound in sheets and gauzy veils, or weighed down with ropes or chains. With titles like “The Tyranny of Doubt” or “The Truce” it’s hard not to see the pieces as portraits of mythological characters, embodying some archetypal human ability or curse. Mostly depicted with their faces obscured, or contorted from some type of bondage, the figures’ entrapment seems more tragic in their desolate surroundings, offering no alternative to the struggle. But their situation is still somehow noble, if seen as shouldering the weight of humanity’s conditions.
via hi fructose
asylum-art:

Barbara Tosatto: Theatrical Paintings Hint at Mythological
Barbara Tosatto ThemesSwiss painter Barbara Tosatto’s work takes cues from the storied and symbolic. Most of her pieces focus on a solitary figure, transplanted in some vacant background, isolated from indicators of time or setting. These figures are human, but disrupted — bound in sheets and gauzy veils, or weighed down with ropes or chains. With titles like “The Tyranny of Doubt” or “The Truce” it’s hard not to see the pieces as portraits of mythological characters, embodying some archetypal human ability or curse. Mostly depicted with their faces obscured, or contorted from some type of bondage, the figures’ entrapment seems more tragic in their desolate surroundings, offering no alternative to the struggle. But their situation is still somehow noble, if seen as shouldering the weight of humanity’s conditions.
via hi fructose
asylum-art:

Barbara Tosatto: Theatrical Paintings Hint at Mythological
Barbara Tosatto ThemesSwiss painter Barbara Tosatto’s work takes cues from the storied and symbolic. Most of her pieces focus on a solitary figure, transplanted in some vacant background, isolated from indicators of time or setting. These figures are human, but disrupted — bound in sheets and gauzy veils, or weighed down with ropes or chains. With titles like “The Tyranny of Doubt” or “The Truce” it’s hard not to see the pieces as portraits of mythological characters, embodying some archetypal human ability or curse. Mostly depicted with their faces obscured, or contorted from some type of bondage, the figures’ entrapment seems more tragic in their desolate surroundings, offering no alternative to the struggle. But their situation is still somehow noble, if seen as shouldering the weight of humanity’s conditions.
via hi fructose
asylum-art:

Barbara Tosatto: Theatrical Paintings Hint at Mythological
Barbara Tosatto ThemesSwiss painter Barbara Tosatto’s work takes cues from the storied and symbolic. Most of her pieces focus on a solitary figure, transplanted in some vacant background, isolated from indicators of time or setting. These figures are human, but disrupted — bound in sheets and gauzy veils, or weighed down with ropes or chains. With titles like “The Tyranny of Doubt” or “The Truce” it’s hard not to see the pieces as portraits of mythological characters, embodying some archetypal human ability or curse. Mostly depicted with their faces obscured, or contorted from some type of bondage, the figures’ entrapment seems more tragic in their desolate surroundings, offering no alternative to the struggle. But their situation is still somehow noble, if seen as shouldering the weight of humanity’s conditions.
via hi fructose
asylum-art:

Barbara Tosatto: Theatrical Paintings Hint at Mythological
Barbara Tosatto ThemesSwiss painter Barbara Tosatto’s work takes cues from the storied and symbolic. Most of her pieces focus on a solitary figure, transplanted in some vacant background, isolated from indicators of time or setting. These figures are human, but disrupted — bound in sheets and gauzy veils, or weighed down with ropes or chains. With titles like “The Tyranny of Doubt” or “The Truce” it’s hard not to see the pieces as portraits of mythological characters, embodying some archetypal human ability or curse. Mostly depicted with their faces obscured, or contorted from some type of bondage, the figures’ entrapment seems more tragic in their desolate surroundings, offering no alternative to the struggle. But their situation is still somehow noble, if seen as shouldering the weight of humanity’s conditions.
via hi fructose
asylum-art:

Barbara Tosatto: Theatrical Paintings Hint at Mythological
Barbara Tosatto ThemesSwiss painter Barbara Tosatto’s work takes cues from the storied and symbolic. Most of her pieces focus on a solitary figure, transplanted in some vacant background, isolated from indicators of time or setting. These figures are human, but disrupted — bound in sheets and gauzy veils, or weighed down with ropes or chains. With titles like “The Tyranny of Doubt” or “The Truce” it’s hard not to see the pieces as portraits of mythological characters, embodying some archetypal human ability or curse. Mostly depicted with their faces obscured, or contorted from some type of bondage, the figures’ entrapment seems more tragic in their desolate surroundings, offering no alternative to the struggle. But their situation is still somehow noble, if seen as shouldering the weight of humanity’s conditions.
via hi fructose
asylum-art:

Barbara Tosatto: Theatrical Paintings Hint at Mythological
Barbara Tosatto ThemesSwiss painter Barbara Tosatto’s work takes cues from the storied and symbolic. Most of her pieces focus on a solitary figure, transplanted in some vacant background, isolated from indicators of time or setting. These figures are human, but disrupted — bound in sheets and gauzy veils, or weighed down with ropes or chains. With titles like “The Tyranny of Doubt” or “The Truce” it’s hard not to see the pieces as portraits of mythological characters, embodying some archetypal human ability or curse. Mostly depicted with their faces obscured, or contorted from some type of bondage, the figures’ entrapment seems more tragic in their desolate surroundings, offering no alternative to the struggle. But their situation is still somehow noble, if seen as shouldering the weight of humanity’s conditions.
via hi fructose
asylum-art:

Barbara Tosatto: Theatrical Paintings Hint at Mythological
Barbara Tosatto ThemesSwiss painter Barbara Tosatto’s work takes cues from the storied and symbolic. Most of her pieces focus on a solitary figure, transplanted in some vacant background, isolated from indicators of time or setting. These figures are human, but disrupted — bound in sheets and gauzy veils, or weighed down with ropes or chains. With titles like “The Tyranny of Doubt” or “The Truce” it’s hard not to see the pieces as portraits of mythological characters, embodying some archetypal human ability or curse. Mostly depicted with their faces obscured, or contorted from some type of bondage, the figures’ entrapment seems more tragic in their desolate surroundings, offering no alternative to the struggle. But their situation is still somehow noble, if seen as shouldering the weight of humanity’s conditions.
via hi fructose
asylum-art:

Barbara Tosatto: Theatrical Paintings Hint at Mythological
Barbara Tosatto ThemesSwiss painter Barbara Tosatto’s work takes cues from the storied and symbolic. Most of her pieces focus on a solitary figure, transplanted in some vacant background, isolated from indicators of time or setting. These figures are human, but disrupted — bound in sheets and gauzy veils, or weighed down with ropes or chains. With titles like “The Tyranny of Doubt” or “The Truce” it’s hard not to see the pieces as portraits of mythological characters, embodying some archetypal human ability or curse. Mostly depicted with their faces obscured, or contorted from some type of bondage, the figures’ entrapment seems more tragic in their desolate surroundings, offering no alternative to the struggle. But their situation is still somehow noble, if seen as shouldering the weight of humanity’s conditions.
via hi fructose

asylum-art:

Barbara Tosatto: Theatrical Paintings Hint at Mythological

Barbara Tosatto ThemesSwiss painter Barbara Tosatto’s work takes cues from the storied and symbolic. Most of her pieces focus on a solitary figure, transplanted in some vacant background, isolated from indicators of time or setting. These figures are human, but disrupted — bound in sheets and gauzy veils, or weighed down with ropes or chains. With titles like “The Tyranny of Doubt” or “The Truce” it’s hard not to see the pieces as portraits of mythological characters, embodying some archetypal human ability or curse. Mostly depicted with their faces obscured, or contorted from some type of bondage, the figures’ entrapment seems more tragic in their desolate surroundings, offering no alternative to the struggle. But their situation is still somehow noble, if seen as shouldering the weight of humanity’s conditions.

via hi fructose

kkdas:

Flaming . . by grantthai on Flickr.

bookmonger99:

Via Wicca Annie ’ s BOS on FB

nevver:

Book posters, Gunter Rambow
nevver:

Book posters, Gunter Rambow
nevver:

Book posters, Gunter Rambow
nevver:

Book posters, Gunter Rambow
nevver:

Book posters, Gunter Rambow
nevver:

Book posters, Gunter Rambow
nevver:

Book posters, Gunter Rambow

nevver:

Book posters, Gunter Rambow


“I live on Earth at present, and I don’t know what I am. I know that I am not a category. I am not a thing — a noun. I seem to be a verb, an evolutionary process – an integral function of the universe.”
— R. Buckminster Fuller

“I live on Earth at present, and I don’t know what I am. I know that I am not a category. I am not a thing — a noun. I seem to be a verb, an evolutionary process – an integral function of the universe.”
— R. Buckminster Fuller

“I live on Earth at present, and I don’t know what I am. I know that I am not a category. I am not a thing — a noun. I seem to be a verb, an evolutionary process – an integral function of the universe.”
— R. Buckminster Fuller

“I live on Earth at present, and I don’t know what I am. I know that I am not a category. I am not a thing — a noun. I seem to be a verb, an evolutionary process – an integral function of the universe.”
— R. Buckminster Fuller

“I live on Earth at present, and I don’t know what I am. I know that I am not a category. I am not a thing — a noun. I seem to be a verb, an evolutionary process – an integral function of the universe.”
— R. Buckminster Fuller

“I live on Earth at present, and I don’t know what I am. I know that I am not a category. I am not a thing — a noun. I seem to be a verb, an evolutionary process – an integral function of the universe.”
— R. Buckminster Fuller

“I live on Earth at present, and I don’t know what I am. I know that I am not a category. I am not a thing — a noun. I seem to be a verb, an evolutionary process – an integral function of the universe.”
— R. Buckminster Fuller

“I live on Earth at present, and I don’t know what I am. I know that I am not a category. I am not a thing — a noun. I seem to be a verb, an evolutionary process – an integral function of the universe.”

R. Buckminster Fuller

nevver:

Landscapes under a microscope, Rebecca Clews
nevver:

Landscapes under a microscope, Rebecca Clews
nevver:

Landscapes under a microscope, Rebecca Clews

nevver:

Landscapes under a microscope, Rebecca Clews